Minimal components of a funding contingency plan

Submitted by sevans on Tue, 03/03/2015 - 4:13pm

Each institution's liquidity policy should have a contingency plan that addresses alternative funding if initial projections of funding sources and uses are incorrect or if a liquidity crisis arises, such as when an institution is having trouble meeting its cash letter. A liquidity contingency plan helps ensure that a bank or consolidated company can prudently and efficiently manage routine and extraordinary fluctuations in liquidity.

Reasons all banks should have a contingency funding plan

Submitted by sevans on Thu, 02/26/2015 - 2:16pm

Each institution's liquidity policy should have a contingency plan that addresses alternative funding if initial projections of funding sources and uses are incorrect or if a liquidity crisis arises, such as when an institution is having trouble meeting its cash letter. A liquidity contingency plan helps ensure that a bank or consolidated company can prudently and efficiently manage routine and extraordinary fluctuations in liquidity.

Importance and basic components of liquidity stress tests

Submitted by sevans on Tue, 02/24/2015 - 3:25pm

Institutions should conduct stress tests regularly for a variety of institution-specific and market wide events across multiple time horizons. The magnitude and frequency of stress testing should be commensurate with the complexity of the financial institution and the level of its risk exposures. Stress test outcomes should be used to identify and quantify sources of potential liquidity strain and to analyze possible impacts on the institution's cash flows, liquidity position, profitability, and solvency.

Critical elements of sound liquidity risk management

Submitted by sevans on Tue, 02/24/2015 - 3:18pm

An institution's liquidity management process should be sufficient to meet its daily funding needs and cover both expected and unexpected deviations from normal operations. Accordingly, institutions should have a comprehensive management process for identifying, measuring, monitoring, and controlling liquidity risk. Because of the critical importance to the viability of the institution, liquidity risk management should be fully integrated into the institution's risk management processes. Critical elements of sound liquidity risk management include:

In addition to a written liquidity policy, a FICU with assets of $50 million or more must have a contingency funding plan (CFP) that clearly sets out strategies for addressing liquidity shortfalls in emergencies. A CFP must include policies, procedures, projection reports, and action plans designed to ensure a credit union’s sources of liquidity are sufficient to fund operating requirements under contingent liquidity events.

Elements of a Contingency Funding Plan

Submitted by sevans on Tue, 02/17/2015 - 3:15pm

Contingency Funding Plan: A credit union must have a written CFP commensurate with its complexity, risk profile, and scope of operations that sets out strategies for addressing liquidity shortfalls in emergency situations. The CFP may be a separate policy or may be incorporated into an existing policy such as an asset/liability policy, a funds management policy, or a business continuity policy. The CFP must address, at a minimum, the following:

(1) The sufficiency of the institution's liquidity sources to meet normal operating requirements as well as contingent events;

In addition to the requirement specified in paragraph (b) of this section to establish and maintain a CFP, any credit union insured pursuant to Title II of the Act that has assets of $250 million or more must establish and document access to at least one contingent federal liquidity source for use in times of financial emergency and distressed economic circumstances. These credit unions must conduct advance planning and periodic testing to ensure that contingent funding sources are readily available when needed.